Sunday, 29 April 2012

Abandoned Farmstead

I was driving back from making a pickup on Sunday morning when I spotted this house and barn, long since abandoned.

I couldn't resist walking through the fence and exploring.

[caption id="attachment_713" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Red door: This lead into what once looked to be a chicken coop."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_714" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Log Structures: Some of the buildings on the property were the original log structures that probably dated from the original settlement of the property."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_715" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="The Mow: Traditionally, the mow (pronounced MAU) would have been where the farmer stored his winter hay."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_716" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Hand Hewn: Take a close look at the timber structure. All hand hewn wood, wooden pegs rather than nail, and the joists did not even have the bark taken off."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_717" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="The Loft: In its day, it would have been stacked to the rafters with hay."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_718" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Water: These basins would have been added much later to the barn in order to provide the cattle with water."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_719" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="The House: At many points during its life, it would have rung with laughter."][/caption]

[caption id="attachment_720" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="Mailbox: No mail gets delivered now, and no one picked up the last of the mail to be delivered."][/caption]